Sexually Transmitted Diseases Education

shafp:

In 2006, an HIV-positive man was diagnosed with leukemia. First he received chemotherapy, and when the cancer returned his doctor recommended a stem-cell transplant with tissues obtained from a bone-marrow donor. After finding an unusually high number of compatible donors, his doctor, Gero Hütter, had a simple idea that would change the course of HIV research. Dr. Hütter knew of a rare genetic mutation that confers immunity to many strains of HIV, including the strain that infected his cancer patient. And new blood cells, including immune cells, are manufactured by bone marrow. What if he could find a bone-marrow donor with this mutation? What effect would it have on the HIV infection?

Five years after his cancer diagnosis, the man, known as the Berlin patient and recently identified as Timothy Ray Brown, is in remission from cancer … and the most sensitive tests have been unable to detect HIV anywhere in his body, despite the discontinuation of antiretroviral drugs. Scientists are a cautious lot, careful not to make grand statements without qualifying them with words like “seem” and “suggest.” But more and more, researchers are starting to say that Brown could be the first case in which a cure for HIV was attained.

READ MORE: http://blog.advocatesaz.org/2011/12/06/sti-awareness-the-future-of-treatment-for-hivaids/

shafp:

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a hot topic these days thanks to the advent — and attendant controversy — of Gardasil, the vaccine that protects against four strains of this sexually transmitted virus. Discourse centers around HPV-16 and HPV-18, the two HPV strains that together are responsible for 70 percent of cervical cancers and 90 percent of anal cancers. However, Gardasil also protects against HPV-6 and HPV-11, two HPV strains that aren’t associated with cancer but rather with 90 percent of genital warts. While genital warts don’t have the potential to cause cancer and death, they can be very upsetting to the people who develop them.

READ MORE: http://blog.advocatesaz.org/2012/04/18/sti-awareness-genital-warts/

icanstandforsomething:

April is STD Awareness Month.
Share this post to raise awareness. 
By the age of 25, half of all sexually active people will have contracted at least one STD. Because most of these people are unaware of their disease status, they may continue to spread STDs to others by having unprotected sex. This includes HIV. 
Planned Parenthood and other clinics may provide testing services at little or no cost to those who would otherwise not be able to afford these services. Testing may be as easy as providing a urine sample or having a blood test. 
For more information: 
http://www.itsyoursexlife.com/gyt
http://www.plannedparenthood.org 

icanstandforsomething:

April is STD Awareness Month.

Share this post to raise awareness. 

By the age of 25, half of all sexually active people will have contracted at least one STD. Because most of these people are unaware of their disease status, they may continue to spread STDs to others by having unprotected sex. This includes HIV. 

Planned Parenthood and other clinics may provide testing services at little or no cost to those who would otherwise not be able to afford these services. Testing may be as easy as providing a urine sample or having a blood test. 

For more information: 

http://www.itsyoursexlife.com/gyt

http://www.plannedparenthood.org 

shafp:

Gonorrhea, colloquially known as “the clap,” is a common sexually transmitted infection caused by sneaky bacteria called Neisseria gonorrhoeae. It is spread by vaginal, anal, and oral sex, and can infect certain cells in the throat, mouth, rectum, urethra, or cervix. It can also be transmitted manually to infect the eye. If you are sexually active, you can reduce risk of transmission by consistently and correctly using latex barriers such as condoms and dental dams.

READ MORE: http://blog.advocatesaz.org/2011/04/11/sti-awareness-gonorrhea/

icanstandforsomething:

Safe, protected sex helps prevent the transmission of sexually-transmitted diseases. Safe sex also helps prevent unwanted pregnancies. 
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Teenagers are going to continue having sex, no matter how much abstinence-only education they get. Let’s keep them informed about their options, starting with an emphasis on safe, protected sex to prevent unwanted pregnancy and the transmission of STIs. And let’s give them alternative options for more “wholesome” activities by promoting after-school programs, maintaining art programs at schools, and getting them interested in and excited about what else makes them special individuals. 
http://www.plannedparenthood.org 

icanstandforsomething:

Safe, protected sex helps prevent the transmission of sexually-transmitted diseases. Safe sex also helps prevent unwanted pregnancies. 

-

Teenagers are going to continue having sex, no matter how much abstinence-only education they get. Let’s keep them informed about their options, starting with an emphasis on safe, protected sex to prevent unwanted pregnancy and the transmission of STIs. And let’s give them alternative options for more “wholesome” activities by promoting after-school programs, maintaining art programs at schools, and getting them interested in and excited about what else makes them special individuals. 

http://www.plannedparenthood.org 

shafp:

April is STD Awareness Month! This is a very exciting time for me. :)

All month long, I’ll be sharing links to quality information on various sexually transmitted infections and methods for prevention. Stay tuned!

From the CDC:

Learn more about STDs, STD Awareness Month, and where you can find the nearest STD testing site in your area:

STI Awareness: Herpes

shafp:

Last year, in my Anatomy & Physiology class, the subject of herpes came up, which launched a few people into mini-tirades laced with judgmental language, describing it as “disgusting” and “gross.” My classmates might have been more sensitive, as statistically speaking, there were probably several people in that very room who were living with herpes. Given that most of my fellow students were pursuing careers in the health-care field, it was especially disheartening. Yet despite being relatively widespread, herpes is often stigmatized and misunderstood.

READ MORE:

http://blog.advocatesaz.org/2011/03/21/sti-awareness-herpes/

shafp:

Cytomegalovirus and Molluscum Contagiosum

Many well-known STIs, such as herpes and HIV/AIDS, are caused by viruses, but this article focuses on two lesser-known viral STIs, cytomegalovirus and molluscum contagiosum.

READ MORE:

http://blog.advocatesaz.org/2011/11/08/sti-awareness-cytomegalovirus-and-molluscum-contagiosum/

shafp:

NEW: STI Awareness: Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea

You’ve probably heard of MRSA, which is pronounced “mersa” and stands for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus — a strain of bacteria that has acquired resistance to methicillin, as well as pretty much every other antibiotic to boot. MRSA is an example of evolution by natural selection — what didn’t kill its ancestors made them stronger, spawning a drug-resistant strain.

Why are we talking about MRSA in a post about STIs? It’s not just because MRSA has apparently found a way to be transmitted sexually, but also because it helps make the concept of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea more accessible. It wasn’t until less than a century ago that we finally developed a magic-bullet treatment for gonorrhea, and for a handful of decades it was quickly and easily treated with a dose of penicillin. Enter evolution by natural selection.

READ MORE HERE: http://blog.advocatesaz.org/2012/03/06/sti-awareness-antibiotic-resistant-gonorrhea/

shafp:

Cytomegalovirus and Molluscum Contagiosum

Many well-known STIs, such as herpes and HIV/AIDS, are caused by viruses, but this article focuses on two lesser-known viral STIs, cytomegalovirus and molluscum contagiosum.

READ MORE:

http://blog.advocatesaz.org/2011/11/08/sti-awareness-cytomegalovirus-and-molluscum-contagiosum/