Sexually Transmitted Diseases Education

totally-fucking-rad:

old people sex positions…
i just died. fuck.

tweetsgoodstuff:

8 Things Every Woman Should Know About Vaginitis
Find out how to spot, treat and prevent the common forms of vaginitis.
Reblog this to help educate your friends. 


*not only women, but all people with vaginas should know this.

tweetsgoodstuff:

8 Things Every Woman Should Know About Vaginitis

Find out how to spot, treat and prevent the common forms of vaginitis.

Reblog this to help educate your friends. 

*not only women, but all people with vaginas should know this.

icanstandforsomething:

April is STD Awareness Month.
Share this post to raise awareness. 
By the age of 25, half of all sexually active people will have contracted at least one STD. Because most of these people are unaware of their disease status, they may continue to spread STDs to others by having unprotected sex. This includes HIV. 
Planned Parenthood and other clinics may provide testing services at little or no cost to those who would otherwise not be able to afford these services. Testing may be as easy as providing a urine sample or having a blood test. 
For more information: 
http://www.itsyoursexlife.com/gyt
http://www.plannedparenthood.org 

icanstandforsomething:

April is STD Awareness Month.

Share this post to raise awareness. 

By the age of 25, half of all sexually active people will have contracted at least one STD. Because most of these people are unaware of their disease status, they may continue to spread STDs to others by having unprotected sex. This includes HIV. 

Planned Parenthood and other clinics may provide testing services at little or no cost to those who would otherwise not be able to afford these services. Testing may be as easy as providing a urine sample or having a blood test. 

For more information: 

http://www.itsyoursexlife.com/gyt

http://www.plannedparenthood.org 

Sexually transmitted diseases in the lesbian community
I have just watched a very educational video and presentation on HIV and AIDS. I have a question that I can't ask my lecturer and the woman who is assisting her with this Talk.
Is there diseases that you can contract if you are lesbian and you are engaging in sexual practices?
People only talk about HIV and AIDS referring to hetero and not homo.
*please answer when reading this. Let's talk. I'd like to hear from you guys.
Answer: Yes, you can get STDs and STIs if you are a lesbian. You can get herpes, HPV, pubic lice, HIV and Hepatitis. Although it's less likely you can also get Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, and Syphilis.
Basic Errors Putting on Condoms Are Common

pozmagazine:

Basic errors—such as putting a condom on too late during intercourse or taking it off before intercourse is over—can contribute to breakage or leakage, according to a study in the journal Sexual Health and reported by MSNBC.com. With perfect use, condoms are 98 percent successful. Researchers at The Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction at Indiana University reviewed 50 studies involving diverse groups, such as married couples and sex workers, over a 16-year period. Between 17 percent and 51.1 percent of participants said they had put on a condom partway through intercourse, which negates protection from sexual transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Richard Crosby, a coauthor of the study, said, “We chronically underestimate how complicated condom use can be.”

A little heavy reading…

sexualhiccup:

The documents below are great sources of information about HPV. Although they are incredibly technical by nature, I feel like people should at least read the “results” sections of each paper.  Knowledge is power. 

Transmission of Human Papillomavirus in Heterosexual Couples:

http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/14/6/pdfs/07-06162.pdf

Sexual Transmission of Human Papillomavirus in Heterosexual and Male Homosexual Couples

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1194144/pdf/genitmed00055-0041.pdf

Stay safe!

gabegarcia85:

UTHealth experts answer questions about the most common sexually transmitted disease in the US, human papillomavirus (HPV): Who should be vaccinated and at what age, how oral cancers are related, how women’s heart disease may be linked, and many others.

How is HPV Contracted?

papillex:

condom

Most people know that HPV is spread through skin-to-skin contact during sexual intercourse (vaginal and anal). And while condoms provide excellent protection against sexually transmitted infections (STIs), they only provide some protection against HPV.

Because condoms do not cover all the skin around your genitals, you can still get the HPV virus though skin-to-skin contact in the genital area even if you’re wearing a condom. It can also be spread through contact with other areas that aren’t covered. In other words, you can get HPV through oral-genital or hand-genital contact – not just intercourse! 

In fact, there has been a huge spike in HPV-linked oral cancer. Researchers reported that over a 20-year period ending in 2004 the percentage of oral cancer linked to HPV surged from 16% to 72%.

Remember, just like any STI, you can be infected with HPV after only one exposure to someone who has the virus. 

Furthermore, you can be infected with HPV more than once, even if you’ve already been exposed to HPV before. Your body may not have developed long-term protection against the virus, and/or you may come into contact with a completely different strain of the virus (there are over 100 different types of HPV).

Condoms are nonetheless still the best way (second to abstinence) to protect yourself from STIs.  So always practice safe sex.

www.papillex.com 

  

fuckyeahplannedparenthood:

It’s been pointed out that a few of our Common Excuses to Not Use a Condom could be viable reasons to, in fact, not use a condom. And that’s right!

Not all partners need condoms. Birth control plans and methods of preventing the spread of STIs need to be tailored to suit the needs of the individual and the partnership. 

Condoms/internal condoms/dental dams are not used for a variety of reasons. Some examples include but are not limited to situations in which:

  • Partners have been tested and are free of STIs.
  • Partners are in a committed relationship (keep in mind this does not only apply to partnerships in which there are only two people) and are not being put at risk of contracting HIV/STIs outside of the relationship.
  • Partners are not trying to prevent a pregnancy or cannot produce a pregnancy. (not using a condom for this reason could still put someone at risk of contracting an STI. That being said, see the first bullet) 
  • Partners are using different forms of barrier methods, such as diaphragms, cervical caps, and sponges. (these methods alone do not protect against STIs. That being said, see the first bullet)
  • A partner is using a hormonal birth control correctly and consistently, including the pill, IUD, depo shot, Ortho-Evra patch, vaginal ring, and Implanon. (hormonal birth control does not protect against STIs. That being said, see the first bullet)

The other reality is: sex does not always occur in situations like the ones listed above, and that’s where condoms/internal condoms/dental dams are essential in protecting one’s health. Some people, regardless of circumstance, simply do not enjoy performing oral sex without a condom or dental dam. Some people just want to have an extra precaution. No matter what, condoms are there as an option!

transfeminism:

Safe Poz Love: Count HIV-Positive Women in on Valentine’s Day

Oakland, Calif. — Showing your love for women living with HIV means supporting our right to our sexuality. This is Valentine’s Day, Count HIV+ Women In! All HIV+ women, including trans women, have the right to enjoyable, hot and safe sex lives, female-controlled methods to prevent transmission, safety to choose when and how to disclose to partners and relationships free from violence.

U.S. Positive Women’s Network, a project of WORLD, celebrates Valentine’s Day as a day to show your love for HIV+ women upholding our rights to safe and satisfying sexual lives.

Current shifts in HIV prevention and care, the War on Women, and HIV criminalization laws threaten HIV+ women’s ability to control our own bodies and sexuality. For example, 36 states and 2 U.S. territories have HIV-specific criminal statutes in which HIV+ people have been arrested and/or prosecuted for consensual sex, biting, and spitting. These laws and practices violate our rights by unfairly policing our bodies and our sexuality, preventing disclosure for fear of persecution, and preventing people from getting tested.Ending violence against women is critical to eliminating HIV transmission. “If you are worried about your safety, you are NOT having conversations about safer sex practices,” says PWNer Kat Griffith in Peoria, Illinois. “Women’s lives are complex, and the links between violence and HIV transmission run deep […] this link can inform our research and prevention messages.”

Trans women frequently cannot depend on the law to protect them from violence or to ensure access to culturally appropriate services. “Just because trans women don’t fit into culturally predefined standards for male or female expression or behavior, doesn’t mean that we lose the right to have an independent sexual identity. […] [trans women] have the right to that individuality, just as we have a right to the air which fills our lungs,” states PWNer Dee Borrego from Boston, Massachusetts.

Show your love for PWN this Valentine’s Day by participating in our Safe Poz Love telebriefing on 2/14 from 9a-10:30a Pacific, reading our blogs, and using our talking points for your advocacy. Sign our Count Us In! petition. Follow and use the hashtags #safepozlove and #pwnusa to learn how you can support the rights of HIV+ women.